the here and now

Late  September though October is probably my favorite time in the garden.

sure, I love the peonies and their brief yet bombacious bloom time is the stuff of my winter dreams.

and the first flush of roses…..just as dreamy  , and even better when they explode along with the bulk of the early clematis

But it is at this time of year, when things are winding down, that I find it so much easier to walk about in the gardens and just enjoy. I know I have at least until the end of  November to clean up the garden for winter , and other than bulbs there is usually very little planting to be done. If something looks ratty it is A-Ok to just cut it back or rip it out as the time for tours is over and no one will see the hole except me.

( just a pause here to wonder why we stop garden touring when many gardens still look so fantastic )

With  fewer plants left that have yet to flower, it is a treat to see buds and anticipate things yet to come.

 

Now is not the time  fret over slugs or fungus, now is not the time to plan , now is the time to just look and appreciate a season well grown.

coral amaranth

coral amaranth

 

rudbeckia

rudbeckia

lablab purpurea or hyacinth bean vinelablab purpurea or hyacinth bean vine

 

sedum and artemesia

sedum and artemesia

 

castor bean ( carmencita)

castor bean ( carmencita)

 

eupatorium rugosum 'Chocolate'

eupatorium rugosum ‘Chocolate’

 

Coral Daisy mum

Coral Daisy mum

 

 allium senescens var glaucum

allium senescens var glaucum

 

dreadlocks amaranth

dreadlocks amaranth

 

a self seeded portulaca

a self seeded portulaca

 

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Nora Leigh phlox

Nora Leigh phlox

 

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clematis terniflora

clematis terniflora

 

sedum and turtlehead

sedum and turtlehead

 

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a seedling hydrangea paniculata

a seedling hydrangea paniculata

 

viburnum plicatum f.tomentosum "summer snowflake'

viburnum plicatum f.tomentosum “summer snowflake’

 

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heritage raspberries

heritage raspberries

 

heptacodium miconioides

heptacodium miconioides

 

salvia ' greggii'cold hardy pink'

salvia ‘ greggii’cold hardy pink’

 

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daucus carrota and coral amaranth

daucus carrota and coral amaranth

 

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cosmos

cosmos

 

magnolia virginiana seedheads

magnolia virginiana seedheads

 

dahlia 'Gingersnaap' and mina lobata

dahlia ‘Gingersnaap’ and mina lobata

 

platycodon gradiflora

platycodon gradiflora

 

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3 thoughts on “the here and now

  1. Harriet Robinson

    What aster is that after the photo of the salvia greggii and before the daucus? It is beautiful. I am guessing it is not Bluebird because mine here in Maine is just starting to bloom. If it is Blue Autumn, how tall does it get? Mine is blooming, but a new plant. The tag said 30″ but on line sources suggest it is shorter. I’ve enjoyed your fall series. I love my fall garden.

    1. Cheryl Post author

      Hi Harriet, so nice to hear someone else loves their fall garden as much as I do! The aster has both a happy and a sad story….here I have been unable to grow any asters at all as the rabbits devour them to the ground. A friend of mine with similar issues had this aster growing in her garden and it alone remained uneaten by the rabbits and she kindly gave me a division. Since then I have divided it and it grows in a few areas here and so far so good. The sad part is she did not know it’s name . I call it Amy’s Aster in her honor.
      I have made a few half hearted attempts to id it and maybe over the winter I will give it another go.

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